Marketing

Your Website SEO Report: 37 Metrics That Must Be Included

Which metrics should you include in your SEO report? 70+ SEO professionals share the SEO metrics that they include (and you should, too.)

Jessica Malnik Jessica Malnik on March 25, 2020 (last modified on July 19, 2020) • 28 minute read

Putting together your weekly (or monthly) website SEO report can be a daunting task.

With so much data available, it can be easy to fall into analysis paralysis. 

In this post, we’re sharing the top 37 metrics that over 70 SEO professionals say they include in their reports.

1. Revenue

2. Lead Value

3. New Leads

4. Conversions

5. Conversion Rate

6. Assisted Conversions

7. Goal Value

8. Backlinks

9. Domain Authority

10. Number of Pages Visited

11. Clicks

12. Acquisition Behavior

13. Keyword Ranking

14. Average Ranking Position

15. Top Keywords

16. Link Value

17. Percentage of traffic driven by a specific keyword

18. Bounce Rate

19. User Behavior

20. Organic Traffic

21. Click-Through Traffic

22. Site Speed

23. Search Queries

24. Engagement

25. Internal Links

26. Organic Entrances

27. Percentage of site traffic from organic search

28. 404 errors

29. Dwell Time

30. Impressions

31. Organic Search Trends

32. Non-Branded Clicks

33. Site Visitors

34. Mobile Visits

35. URL Growth Trends

36. Page Value

37. Time on Site

1. Revenue 

“The most pertinent metric is ultimately, the money-metric,” says Paul Martin of PeriscoPe.

“SEO has a history of smoke and mirrors, and the industry still often perpetuates this in its reporting, which only further clouds the importance of the organic channel. Yes, rankings, share of voice, links, long tail, etc., are all important to move the needle, but they’re a means to an end. The focus of the report should always be on whatever the money driver is for that specific business.” 

Bobby Lyons of sitejet says, “At the end of the day every marketing spend needs to have a calculated return. Without revenue, that return cannot be calculated.” 

David Gossage of lookfantastic adds, “That is the ultimate goal of any marketer and all other metrics are just there to support it. It’s also a good way of ensuring that any traffic driven to the site is helping to support this goal or is just irrelevant. One important aspect to bear in mind; different types of content or businesses will require different types of attribution. Blog articles will generally have low last click conversion rate but are a vital part of the conversion funnel. The same applies to high-value products, which have a high consideration time.” 

Mike Kazmirchuk of SupportYourApp takes a slightly different approach. 

“I’d suggest you start tracking the real impact of your SEO efforts,” says Kazmirchuk. 

“You can use a metric. But I’m more into combination charts. And the chart that should be included on any website SEO report is pretty simple: it’s a time series with two Y axes – one is for organic sessions, and another is for revenue from those sessions.

If you (for some reason) do not measure revenue or have a complicated business model with not that straightforward attribution model – you still can use this chart. Just use conversion rate instead of revenue.

To put this data in one metric – simply divide your revenue by the number of organic sessions and you’ll get Revenue Per Session. You can then multiply this number by 1,000 – to calculate revenue per one thousand sessions (RPM) – if that’s more suitable to your business.” 

2. Lead Value 

Will Nye of Builtvisible explains, “A close proxy metric is like lead value. Ultimately, most senior stakeholders at a business will rightly be focused on the monetary value they are deriving from their marketing channels. We, as SEOs, need to learn to speak their language, demonstrating our success — or securing buy-in for initiatives — using the metrics that matter to them.” 

3. New Leads

Korey Kashmer of Kashmer Interactive says, “We believe strongly in reporting on website traffic and leads for clients. More specifically and one of the most important metrics is year over year traffic / lead data. It reflects where they were and what our growth / efforts have been over the past year. The majority of our clients like to see this, especially after working with them for several years.”

Brian Barwig of Integrate Digital Marketing adds, “In theory, as marketers, we should be able to dig down and determine the monthly ROI we provide for clients. This is a tall task for some though as many times, small businesses either don’t have the time or know-how to analyze how each of their new customers were acquired. Showing the total leads each month is the next best route, as it provides insight into how many potential customers we are sending the business. The business can expand on that further if they are able, and if not, they can at least see the monthly Total Leads trend.” 

4. Conversions 

”One thing that should be included in every website SEO report should be conversion data,” says Thomas Brodbeck of FoundSM. “If you are working to improve the SEO for a client, you should be focused on conversions as well. If you are increasing traffic, but conversions aren’t increasing, you should be refocusing your efforts to terms and topics that drive conversions.”

Conversions are typically either new leads or sales. However depending on the business, this can sometimes be other things like newsletter sign-ups, meetings scheduled, etc. 

“This may differ from site to site depending on the goals set out by the business,” says Rob Ramirez of Digital Eagles. “For ecommerce this will likely be organic revenue figures. For service-based businesses they can include contact or quote form submissions and clicks to contact links like a phone number, email address or address.” 

To add to this point, 93% of the marketers we surveyed said that their SEO metrics were very important to other marketing efforts. 

Amber Alesi of Matchbox Design Group says, “If I were to choose one metric that should be in all SEO reports, it would be the number of conversions from organic traffic sources.” 

“Without a doubt, organic conversions,” says Andrea Schultz of Sure Oak. “Whether a conversion means newsletter signups, an online purchase or a demo request, whatever the main goal of the website is, that is what should be tracked as a conversion and segmented by those coming organically versus other channels.” 

Max Jonasen of Constant Clicks adds, “Traffic is all good and well, but without ROI it’s useless. This will also give insight as to what keywords you should ideally be targeting and is something I see a lot of marketers skip out on.”

As Vlad Davniuk of Beverly SEO Studio points out, “Business owners don’t care about bounce rate or average session duration, etc. They want to see the number of conversions grow.  

Simba Mudonzvo of SEO for beginners says, “The whole point of any marketing campaign is to achieve some type of business goal (whether macro e.g. sales or micro e.g. leads, lower marketing costs, get more email subscribers, etc, so any SEO report needs to show how SEO is helping the client achieve its business goals.” 

Editor’s Note: If you use Hubspot and Google Analytics, this dashboard shows you the number of inbound leads.

Veronica De Borba of OnPoint Internet Marketing says, “People care about results so it’s very important that you make it to the point by showing the results you have produced for them.” 

Deniz Doganay of Digital Debut adds, “Tracking conversions from Organic Search is very important. Apart from looking at metrics on rankings and organic traffic, it is good to know how many conversions are coming from a company’s SEO efforts and from what pages. This will let us know if we need to engage in some conversion rate optimization for a website redesign to make the most out of the great results of the SEO campaign.” 

For example, Tony Greenland of Fintech Industrial Abrasives says, “The most important metric for our factory is conversions. At the end of the day, we’re doing SEO to increase conversions, so that’s what we want to track over anything else. We want to know whether or not our efforts have been successful in generating a return on investment. Conversions are the very first metric in our report. We run an e-commerce site, so for us, conversions are web sales and that’s what we track. For other businesses, conversions may be inquiries in the form of calls, form submissions, or chats. Whatever metrics your business is utilizing to identify conversions, that’s what I’d make sure you’re really focusing on.” 

Piotr Olesson of Reef Digital adds, ‘When possible, to provide an accurate number of organic conversions (or leads) that are being generated throughout the reporting period. This is invaluable business information because it provides insights into:

1) Understanding how users are executing the desired action on a client’s website whether it’s a hard conversion (purchase) or a soft conversion (email sign up) for example.

2) Gaining insights into viewing which pages are driving the largest and lowest conversions.

3) Understanding overall what type of conversions are best and least performing.

4) Establishing potential ROI value based on marketing activity.

5) Providing data that can be benchmarked against previous or future performance.” 

5. Conversion Rate 

“One often-overlooked metric that should be included in every SEO report is your organic goal conversion rate,” says Darin Evangelista of Lyda Law Firm. “If you haven’t set up goals in Google Analytics, you need to do that ASAP. Knowing where your conversions are coming from is essential when creating long-term marketing plans for any organization. When you understand how visitors are finding your website and what traffic channels are converting visitors into customers, you’ll have a better understanding of where you should allocate your marketing resources.” 

Taylor Randolph of ParkFellows adds, “It is possible for website traffic to increase and at the same time the goal conversion rate remains flat.  While increased traffic numbers might look great on an SEO report, it will not matter to your client unless these numbers are converting. Keep the goal completion rates affixed to the top of the SEO report and show that your SEO strategies are working.

6. Assisted Conversions 

“I feel an overlooked metric in SEO reports are assisted conversions,” says Matt Bassos of Vuly Play. “Search traffic is often the first touch point to a website, so understanding how contributes to the overall conversion funnel is important for the client to understand. Google Analytics provide valuable data regarding assisted conversions and allows you to see conversion attribution through different steps of the consumer journey. This let’s you shape other areas of your digital marketing, for example how paid traffic interacts with organic search queries.” 

7. Goal Value

Mark Rushworth of WMG says, “Organic goals/revenue for whatever goals/revenue metrics that are important. Ideally, there’s a revenue value assigned to each goal allowing for ROI reporting on a commercial level.” 

8. Backlinks 

Jesse Chettle of TheVoIPHub says, “For a report of backlinks built the most important metric that should be focused on and included in the report is the number and quality of referring domains to the sites you received links from.” 

Mario DeAlmeida of HotHeadTech.com adds, “It’s important to see on an ongoing basis how links are trending and if overall velocity is being maintained. An SEO report is very important if a business revolves heavily on SEO traffic to gain new business.” 

9. Domain Authority  

“Domain authority, If I could only include one metric to indicate how well a website is performing, it would be this,” says Dan Lacey. “This is a number out of 100 which indicates how well your website is going to rank in search engines and takes multiple factors into account, such as your technical website setup, on-page optimization and particularly your inbound link profile.

Every time your domain authority gets higher, the next number to reach gets harder, so it can be really difficult to achieve high numbers. Once you do achieve a high domain authority, everything else becomes much easier, including ranking your website highly for some popular keywords.

An added bonus is that it becomes much easier to persuade popular people in your industry to feature or guest post on your website if you have high domain authority, as linking to their website then gives them a very valuable backlink!” 

Editor’s Note: Use this SEO Overview Dashboard to view your site’s domain authority along with other leading SEO health metrics. 

10. Number of Pages Visited  

“For your team, I’d say pages visited,” says Toni JV of JVT Media. “Your homepage will most likely always be number 1, but we want to keep track of what pages do the best in terms of traffic. This way, we can understand what sorts of things our target audience is interested in, and optimize future content to be more enticing to them.” 

11. Clicks   

“Clicks, specifically from Google Search Console, says Daniel Liddle of Green Park Content. ”This is first-party data from Google and not skewed by potentially not adequate analytics set up on a site.” 

Alex Darwin of HOME Agency says, “A website can’t rely solely on brand exposure, that’s why it’s important to keep perspective on the number of organic clicks coming from searches with commercial intent. Classify the search terms highlighted by search console and measure whether your client’s commercial clicks are improving over time.” 

Matt Slaymaker of Folsom Creative adds, “When we create SEO reports in Databox, we pull metrics from Google Search Console to build our dashboards. Of all of the metrics we present to our clients, one, in particular, seems to be of great interest – Queries by Clicks & Position. This is a great metric to measure because it allows our clients to see what are the terms their potential customers are searching for the most, and how we currently rank for that keyword. We then monitor the performance over time to see how an improved keyword rank is leading to more organic clicks.”

12. Acquisition Behavior 

“An important metric that should be tracked in any website’s SEO report is its acquisition behavior,” says Osiris Parikh of Summit Mindfulness. “This is essential to understanding how well the website is leveraging various SEO techniques to boost social and direct visitors. These metrics, once explored further, can help a company better strategize how to attract more visitors.” 

“Every website SEO report should include an acquisition breakdown,” adds Jenna Alburger of Outlier Creative. “Looking at the percentage of new users by source / medium will give you an idea of where your traffic is coming from and where you can improve.” 

13. Keyword Ranking 

“One metric that should be included in any website’s SEO report is keyword ranking,” says Bruce Hogan of SoftwarePundit. “This is the best way to monitor the progress of your SEO efforts in improving your rankings, and quickly detect any negative impact of Google algorithm changes.” 

Oliver Dale of MoneyCheck.com says, “Keyword ranking is something we watch very closely. It’s a metric that’s simple to understand. It can provide intel about consumer trends and, if you monitor very closely, you’ll gather insight into the sentiment and impact implied by search term rank changes.

Andrea Loubier of Mailbird adds, “Keyword rankings are extremely important, as this is how you can tell if the keywords that you selected are performing in the way that you had hoped. In this way, you can pivot if you aren’t seeing the numbers that you should, and select new keywords that may rank differently.” 

Melanie Musson of 4AutoInsuranceQuote.com agrees, “You must have the keywords your audience is searching for. Without them, you won’t get any leads or conversions.” 

Austin Anderson of Circa Interactive adds, “When sending over SEO reports, it’s always important to highlight how individual pages are ranking in the SERPs and which keywords each of the pages are ranking for. When showing the client their keyword rankings report, you can lay out a strategy on how to link-build and create new content around target keywords in order to boost the rankings and organic traffic.”

14. Average Ranking Position 

“One metric that should be included in any website SEO report is average ranking position over time,” says Andrew Becks of 301 Digital Media. “In my experience, the best SEO reports aren’t just those that show SEO as a snapshot of a moment in time, but that show a historical trend to ensure that SEO rankings and overall performance are trending positively over a longer time horizon.” 

Dan Rawley of Twinkl Educational Publishing says, “While reporting on the number of keywords ranked for is useful, without the context of being able to see their average position this is largely a vanity metric as keywords may be ranking several pages down the SERPs, where they’re highly unlikely to attract traffic.” 

Alistair Dodds of Ever Increasing Circles adds, “This is the real barometer of your SEO efforts so it’s vital this is tracked in every report. If the business you work for is seasonal then ensuring you are comparing the results from the same month the year before is important. If your client is not seasonal then you have the option of comparing to the previous month as well as updating your overall 6-month trend line.” 

Alexander Sirris agrees, “If I had to choose just one metric to include in an SEO report, it would be keyword ranking movements. I mean isn’t that why we’re all here, is to track whether we’re reaching the #1 spot or moving relative to a previous position. I feel like anything else would be sub-par. To use a metaphor, it’d be like if the NBA just didn’t keep score throughout their games.” 

15. Top Keywords 

“The number of top three keywords should be included on any website SEO report,” says Tony Mastri of MARION Marketing Agency. “While this doesn’t directly translate into leads, it is an intermediate step that can indicate whether your SEO strategy is working. It is also a signal that you’re developing the necessary expertise, authority, and trust to show up for your target commercial keywords.” 

16. Link Value  

“Personally, I enjoy calculating a website’s link value,” says Jared Carrizales of Heroic Search. “This can be used in an SEO report, as well as upfront in the sales process. There are many ways to calculate this, but I like using Ahref’s traffic value metric. For example, at the time of writing, Databox.com has a traffic value of $99,400 per month. Once divided by the total amount of linking root domains (2,980), you get a link value of $33 per month. That doesn’t sound like much, but assuming that each link will stay live for approximately 30 months, you get a TRUE link value of $990 (30 months x $33). Including this calculation into an SEO report can very clearly illustrate how valuable each link can be over the course of its lifetime. Calculated on a rolling basis, it can also show how link building is a worthwhile endeavor for sites that are early in their digital marketing process.” 

17. Percentage of Traffic Driven by a Specific Keyword 

Hillary Glaser of Ellie & Jojo Communications says, “Keyword to Traffic report – understanding what keyword generates traffic (and conversions) is a must-have.” 

18. Bounce Rate 

“Bounce Rate – UX metrics are extremely important but aren’t utilized or explained enough in SEO,” says Arash Ghaemi. “The purpose of improving your rankings is to get in front of the right users so they click on your results. Google records all sorts of UX metrics that we probably don’t even know about.” 

Avinash Chandra adds, “Bounce rate is that one metric that should be part of any website SEO report because it is the indicator of whether your content is appealing to your target audience or not.” 

19. User Behavior 

“User behavior is one of the metrics that matter most to us,” says John Donnachie of ClydeBank Media. “For our team, behavior demonstrates a deeper look into the effectiveness of our content. When combined with landing page, exit page, bounce rate, and session duration we can better understand whether or not we are hitting the mark with our content.

20. Organic Traffic

“Tracking the organic traffic to your website’s landing pages is crucial for your SEO report,” says Anna Tatelman of Pelicoin. “The big picture of all SEO strategies is increasing the number of visitors who reach your site without the use of paid ads. When you monitor the organic traffic by landing page, you can figure out which of your SEO plans for certain pages are working well and which ones need improvement.” 

Tung Dao of Avada Commerce says, “Traffic Growth. It’s almost always the end goal of any SEO effort.” 

Dinah Adams of Futurety adds, “If you only include one metric in an SEO report, you should include organic traffic acquisition to the site. Specifically, you want to look at the number of users navigating to your site through organic search. Since the goal of search engine optimization is to make sure that search engines view your site favorably, increases or decreases in organic traffic indicate your site’s SEO health. Breaking down organic acquisition by source (Google, Bing, Yahoo, etc) can also give you clues into how your site is viewed by different search engines.” 

“When measuring the value of your SEO efforts, one of the most critical metrics for measuring results is the actual amount of traffic generated by organic traffic,” says Rob Sanders of Socially Found. “Website traffic numbers give you an overall idea of your site’s performance but narrowing it down to organic traffic is a better way to measure the impact of your SEO efforts.

This can be viewed in Google Analytics by navigating to Acquisition > All Traffic > Source/Medium and looking for “Organic Search” in the main table.” 

Slawek Czajkowski of Surfer adds, “Organic traffic is the most critical metric included in the SEO report. In many cases, the change in traffic speaks for itself, but there are exceptions.

The traffic should be compared either with the previous month (for non-seasonal websites) or relevant last year’s period (for seasonal businesses). Numbers, along with taken actions, should be explained comprehensively for the client, especially if the change in traffic was a succession of our SEO strategy.” 

Cara Oorbeck of Green Wellness Life explains, “A lot of marketers like to focus on their efforts from the bottom up. They put a lot of focus on the granular efforts in highlighting rankings. 

We like to start from the top down. The one metric we analyze heavily is organic traffic, and we filter that traffic as well. For businesses that sell internationally, no filter is probably needed. We really only sell to customers in the US, so we filter our organic traffic to only show US visitors for our reports. 

Because we’re starting from the top it’s easier to see larger trends. If traffic ends up decreasing in one month compared to another, we can then analyze which pages lost traffic and once we know the pages, we can then look at the rankings to see what needs to be improved. We find it’s much better to use this top-down approach. If you’re just studying rankings, you may not know which searches are generating clicks or which searches are leading to revenue. It’s much easier to start with an analysis of page and site traffic and work backward from there because at the end of the day it’s more important for us to be driving relevant traffic that is converting as opposed to chasing certain keywords that may not necessarily move the dial.” 

21. Click-Through Traffic 

“With the ever-changing nature of search results and the massive shift to mobile web, click-through rate (CTR) is more important than ever,” says Gennady Lager of DealNews. “Traditional organic rankings no longer tell a well-represented story due to device types, new ad units, featured snippets, and more. Everyone should use Google Search Console to understand the trends of their CTR’s at the page and keyword levels to see if their SEO efforts are panning out.” 

22. Site Speed 

Michelle Symonds of Ditto Digital says, “There are so many important metrics in SEO but increasingly mobile site speed is becoming a differentiating factor between competitors. Many websites still have poor performance on mobile devices so improving mobile speed can often be a quick win.” 

“Site speed, says Emily Perkins of OggaDoon. “It affects so much: mobile optimization, search engine ranking, and your visitors’ irritation levels! If you want to give your visitors one reason to stick around on your site, make sure your site speed is reasonable and you’re constantly checking that you’re not slowing everything down.” 

Mark Aselstine of Uncorked Ventures adds, “This is becoming an ever-important ranking factor and sometimes site design and SEO are treated like odd stepbrothers when they shouldn’t be.” 

Magnus Matthiesen of Obsidian says, “There’s a huge potential to optimize the page speed. Page speed has a big impact across all other channels as well, as it directly impacts bounce rates and conversion rates.” 

Betsy Sprenkle of 9 Clouds adds, “If your website isn’t speedy you are already losing people which is essentially increasing your bounce rate.” 

23. Search Queries 

“This is vital to understand how the search engine is associating your website with keywords,” says Cody Bollerman. “Instead of only handing over the desired keyword list pre-approved that you are trying to achieve it is important to have a list of keywords Google is actively granting impressions to already.” 

24. Engagement 

“Visitor Engagement – whether that’s average time on site or average pages viewed per visit,” says Robert Spinrad of SEOM Interactive. “I like to know how site visitors are engaging with the website.”

Bryan Coe of Blackbird e-Solutions, LLC adds, Engagement – i.e. what are people converting on. We can send a million people to a site, but if they don’t engage, what’s the point. You can’t eat sessions.”  

25. Internal Links 

“Internal links are unique because they feed traffic to pages on your own site,” says Eric Mellmer of Proline Range Hoods. “So, you have total control over what you link internally and what you don’t. This allows you to create content hubs or content silos on popular topics in your industry. You can develop a series of related articles and only link them to each other; the hope is that your customers will click on these internal links, ultimately boosting your site traffic. This is an effective strategy to boost your traffic on several articles, rather than just one.” 

26. Organic Entrances  

”Organic Entrances is an often overlooked metric to include,” says Collin Tate of Simplexity Marketing. “Getting visits to deeper, low-authority pages is important to ranking for more diverse, relevant search terms. Seeing an overall rise in organic traffic is a big ego-booster and a feather in your cap when reporting out to your client.

But which pages are responsible for the traffic increase? Looking at a landing page report and including the number of Entrances from organic helps you and your clients gauge just how effective your SEO efforts are.

Reporting organic landing page entrances to show your client that you’re hyperfocused on driving more traffic to all pages and not just one or a few.” 

27. Percentage of Site Traffic from Organic Search  

“One metric that should be included in any website SEO report is the percent of users who access your website organically,” says Dylan Zsigray of Kiwi Creative. “You devote time and energy to SEO to boost your organic search performance on Google. As such, as you begin to rank better on SERPs, you hope that the percentage of organic users on your website will increase. Take a look at your user acquisition breakdown and include the top five sources in your report. In many cases, your direct accesses will be the top, especially if you have excellent brand recognition. But, if you notice your organic acquisition percentage is stagnant or decreasing month-over-month or quarter-over-quarter, then it opens a discussion for additional changes that need to be made. While a website’s organic acquisition is not the only determiner of SEO success, it does provide insight into what’s working and what’s not. To take this further, you can also look at the source on a page-by-page basis to see what content your users find valuable and which are boosting your SEO growth.” 

28. 404 errors 

AJ Salussolia of ReviewJax adds, “If you have good keyword stats, traffic, and a high-quality conversion rate, you are still missing out if you have a ton of broken pages.” 

29. Dwell Time 

“Dwell time is an underrated, but super important metric,” says Andy Crestodina of Orbit Media Studios. “It’s the one user interaction signal that correlates with quality and is a likely search ranking factor. Dwell time is the average time on page when the visitor comes from search. Check dwell time for specific URLs. If anything clocks in lower than the site average, go improve those pages by adding detail, data, examples or contributor quotes.

A lot of marketers worry about bounce rate, which isn’t irrelevant. It impacts marketing outcomes, but it’s not a search ranking factor. In case you’re wondering, the average bounce rate for visitors from search is 55.6% according to our Bounce Rate Benchmark Study, which looked at 500+ websites.” 

30. Impressions 

“One metric that needs to be included in any website’s SEO report is total number of impressions, and whether that number is climbing month over month,” says Nikola Roza of SEO for the Poor and Determined. ”Impressions are not clicks obviously, and clicks are better for business, but often behavior in total impressions count is a clear indication whether your SEO is working or not.

So, typically when you start a brand new SEO campaign it will take several months to get some steam going and get some tangible results.

However, before that steam, you can guess where the campaign is headed by the presence (or lack thereof) of smoke (impressions).

So, once you’ve determined your baseline impression count, that is X number of impressions for a 30 day time period, and 30 days from that point in time you have significantly more, then that you can assume Google is responding favorably to your SEO and you can assume that if you continue doing what you’re doing and is obviously working, you will get even more impressions, and what’s more, you will start getting clicks. First a few, but that number will quickly grow.” 

31. Organic Search Trends 

“A great starting point is looking at organic search trends,” says Raine Gaisford of LimeHub. “From there it’s a filter-down approach looking into what has impacted those trends, which keywords are performing best, which carry the highest conversion rates, etc. Once a picture has been painted then an action plan can be put together. Metrics are essential to reporting but still require a plan for continuous improvement.” 

32. Non-Branded Clicks 

“Non branded clicks,” says Charlie Whitworth of WhitworthSEO. “Although Google Search Console is by no means the perfect solution to this, it’s a great start and should inform the start of your analysis into how your SEO efforts are impacting non-branded performance. This can be easily interrogated and reported on using Google Search Console and allows you to track impressions and clicks and correlate with your implementation.” 

33. Site Visitors 

Sumitra Senapaty of WOW Club adds, “One metric to include is site visitors, and whether they have increased since the last report. It’s important to see that your strategies are working, as well as if your site visitors are new or returning.” 

34. Mobile Visits 

“Besides knowing how your customers are finding you: organic search, direct, referral, social media, email, etc, one key metric that should be included in the SEO report is the comparison between mobile and desktop visits,” says Chris Russo of Nickerson. “This way, the marketing team knows what devices the customers are using to get to your website and can enhance the design, layout, and content accordingly.” 

35. URL Growth Trends 

“The URLs with biggest % ΥοΥ growth in clicks,” says Apostolis Lianos of ON.marketing. “This metric shows you which pieces of content (pages) had the biggest growth so you get an instant and brief idea of what worked for you in order to repeat it.” 

36. Page Value

“I highly recommend reporting on-page value,” says Rose Jinks of Online Mortgage Advisor. “SEO is about driving the RIGHT type of traffic which converts, whether it’s e-commerce or lead generation. It’s all good showing traffic is up, or goal completions in GA are up, but what’s the value of this? Page value is a good indication of the ROI – the more you keep driving through SEO, the better it is all around.” 

37. Time on Site 

“Time on site,” says Steve Silberberg of Fitpacking. “I don’t know why it doesn’t appear on every single report. It can be far more important than conversions.” 

In sum, these are 37 SEO metrics that are worth paying attention to. Depending on your business’s goals, some of these metrics may be more relevant than others. We recommend tracking the metrics that tie the most closely to your goals. 

About the author
Jessica Malnik
Jessica Malnik Jessica Malnik is a content strategist and copywriter for SaaS and productized service businesses. Her writing has appeared on The Next Web, Social Media Examiner, SEMRush, CMX, Help Scout, Convince & Convert, and many other sites.
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